Wait for the Beep

Telecommunication-Antenna__36092

Telecommunication-Antenna__36092 (Photo credit: Public Domain Photos)

Consider the microwave. Consider the cell phone and the pager. While you’re at it, consider anything in your life that goes beep, buzz, blurp, zing, or plays a catchy little tune that you yourself have programmed it to play.

Do you panic when you discover that you’ve left your cell phone at home? “How will I make it through the day without my electronic communications device?” you say.

Do you find yourself wanting to put your fist through the door of your microwave after seventeen courses of beeps, reminding you that your coffee is getting cold?

Years before the electronic boom, cars, motorcycles, jackhammers, and the like were considered noise pollution. Now, everyone has a different sound exuding from their person at one time or the other. This not being bad enough, the problem is exacerbated by the multiple conversations heard anytime and anywhere.

Can you imagine if the signal from every radio, television, cell phone, pager, or transmitter were visible? What would it look like? Would we be able to see anything else, including each other? Would it be a solid hue or more like black and white ant-races on a broken TV?

And what really boggles the mind…. How do all these millions of signals, being sent simultaneously, get to their intended destination? On one hand, the technological age we have entered is amazing; on the other, annoying at best, disruptive at worst.

As far as attempting to draw a grand analogy between technology and writing, give your fingers a rest, stop texting, and call me.

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