Monthly Archives: June 2021

Before I Penned My First Novel, I Couldn’t Help But Think “What a Daunting Task”

Before I penned my first novel, I couldn’t help but think What a daunting task. Now that I’m working on number six, I admit my thought process has changed a bit.

When I began Rising Tide, my first objective was, of course, to complete this impossible goal set for myself.

Then, wonder of wonders, five months after beginning my first science fiction/ fantasy novel,  the word completion actually applied. Little did I realize as I finished writing this work of fiction  that writing would be the easiest task on the road to publication.

Rewrites and edits took longer than the actual writing of Rising Tide. Finding a publisher was all but impossible. Once I located a publisher,  came more rewrites and editing. After finishing cover art, back matter, dedications and acknowledgements, a completed novel was ready for the book shelves.

Now, all I had to do was entice people to read this exciting new novel, not to mention compete with the thousand new books released the same day as mine.

I won’t go any further than to mention my second novel, a sequel to the first, took several years to complete due to my trouble being satisfied with the story line and taking breaks to pen two other novels. Just a little FYI in case you’re contemplating your first book.

Have a fantastic week and may God bless you richly and keep you safe.  

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I Have a Small Furry Creature with Yellow Eyes and the Gift of Speech

In my four-part book series, Rising Tide, I have a small furry creature with yellow eyes and the gift of speech. The creature, known as a Nuckta, is the last of its race and goes by the name Seeka. This animal is not a pet, but a character, just as any other in the story.

It sets me thinking of the pets I owned in my younger years. 

I first recall a Dachshund we named Bo-Peep. I was but a few years old when we took her in, but a teenager when she passed at a ripe old age.

Living in a rural area, we had our share of strays. That was how we acquired our next mutt I named Ralph, a large breed that resembled a sheepdog. Ralph’s ownership overlapped Bo-Peep’s so there were multiple dogs in our household for a while. Ralph and I were inseparable for quite a few years until heart worms claimed my pal.

Lumpy, Marvin, and Gomer followed with the latter being the sweetest and dumbest dog to walk this earth. All of our family and a portion of our neighbors hit this dog with their cars. Poor Gomer could just not learn to stay out of harm’s way, and as much as we tried to avoid contact, it was not to be. Gomer was more like a cat with nine lives until a stranger zipping down the road in front of our house hit him for the last time.

I kept an odd array of pets, including an alligator (which I think was actually a Caiman), Boa constrictor, numerous lizards, turtles, small rodents, a ferret named Floyd, and the crème de la crème, a Black Widow spider.

I watched the arachnid for many weeks feast upon insects before laying two enormous egg sacks. Upon awakening one morning, I noticed both egg-sacs had hatched. The jar now housed mother and a few thousand babies. It was apparent this glass abode was  not adequate to house them all after “Mom’s” delivery. With nothing but a fine mesh cloth covering the square hole cut into the top of the jar for ventilation, the need for something “more” was evident. A can of Raid took care of any residual beasties.

I do believe the last paragraph in this week’s post will prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that teenagers have the propensity to display large amounts of stupid. Please learn from my stupidity not to raise deadly arachnids. Nuff said.

Have one great week and may God bless you richly.

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