Tag Archives: writing

Most Esteemed Toddlers in Our Nation’s Capital. Today’s Lesson Is on the Need for Ethics.

Most esteemed toddlers in our nation’s capital. Today’s lesson is on the need for ethics. Can you spell this most difficult of words? Obviously not, since this is something you possess at the percentage rate of zero.

As we are wanton to do every four to eight years, it is time to move the herd around in the DC political stockyard. I am convinced, save for a handful, the ones that occupy these many seats are pretty much interchangeable, whether Repub or Demo. They are most certainly bred to use the largest amount of verbiage to say absolutely nothing. As one would suspect, the few days each year they do work, they sit on their hind quarters and do absolutely nothing, but draw a paycheck.

I don’t know what it takes to procure a job like this, but then again, I have this uncanny need  to sleep at night. Of course, this requires a conscience which, like most everything else that is good, has been driven out of our nation’s capital.

Our Constitutional Republic is by far the greatest government in the world; however, if the last few decades have shown us anything, it is time to lose the dead weight that has been around too long. I don’t mean to harp . . . but I guess that’s what I’ve been doing the past month or so.

I will suggest one solution and that is: remove all seats, benches, and furniture from both Houses. Replace them with sand, and let our representative toddlers cover up turds with their plastic shovels and buckets, while clad in diapers. At least, they would accomplish something.

Nuff said!

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My Web Log Soon Began to Spread From The World of Writing, to the World, of One Might Say, The World

When I started this blog several years ago it was meant to be geared around writing. As fate would have it, my web log soon began to spread from the world of writing, to the world, of one might say, the world.

For instance: I thought I would pull something out of the air about which we all have heard but seldom gave much thought. A classic example is, “What came first the chicken or the egg?” Although this adage is older than dirt, I’m sure at one time it raised a perplexing question.

Just as, “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound?” I guess you could take either side of both adages and make a case for each.

I would much rather toss something new into the pot such as, “If a groundhog died in the woods and no one was around, would it still exude a smell?” Now, I’ll admit this is much like the tree, but with different players.

Or how about, “Is half of forever still forever?”

Maybe this will spark some interest: “If all of the clocks in the world stopped simultaneously, would it affect time as we know it, since we would have no way of telling time?”

And the creme de la crème: “If a bell rang in a mortuary after all but the deceased had gone for the day, would the tiny bones in the ears of the dead (hammer anvil and stirrup) still collect the sound waves?”

Just a little food for thought . . . and by the way, can anyone tell me why the dining areas in the military are called “mess halls?”

Have a great week, may God bless, and thanks for reading what flows from my brain.

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How Often Have You Been Queried, “Do You Have The Time?”

How often have you been queried, “Do you have the time?” Perhaps you have needed the same information having left your time piece at home. Regardless of the answer, we as human beings have a need to know the time at any given moment.

Back in the day, we used the sun, then, turned to archaic instruments, such as, sundials. Once mechanical clocks came into use, sundials were still used to set the mechanical clocks–kinda reminds me of innovation in reverse.

Let’s say, sundials are no longer used, (in some cases they still are) and we are totally reliant on clocks of today. When the word clock comes to mind, I remember the big round institutional clocks you see in schools, hospitals, etc.

I learned to tell time on a clock with an hour, minute, and second hand. We ,then, evolved to flip number clocks, digital, and now, I have reverted to the round wall clocks with three hands; however, these time pieces are controlled (I assume by satellite) so they automatically reset for daylight savings time and EST. Plus, if its primary function of time keeping happens to lapse, whether slow or fast, it will come to a halt and quickly run through a 24 hour cycle, returning to its normal function once the time difference is corrected.

My latest novel, Dalon Con (The Annihilation of Time) contains temporal travel . . . I wonder if any of my characters were carrying time pieces of any kind? Perhaps, I should go back and search for contraband  . . . nah, if they managed to keep it this long undetected, let’em have it.

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On December 21st, We Will Be Treated to a Rare Sight Termed, “The Great Conjunction of 2020”

On December 21st, we will be treated to a rare sight termed, “The Great Conjunction of 2020,” when Jupiter and Saturn, according to astronomy.com, appear to almost merge. Astronomers are calling this a Christmas Star which hasn’t been seen in roughly 800 years.

Forbes.com tells us a triple conjunction, (three great conjunctions in one year) transpired in 7 BC. I find this amazing, as Jesus’ birthday actually took place in June or July coinciding with the three instances allowing for the Christmas Star to appear. What better way for God to implement the appearance of the Christmas Star than to used a natural occurrence, such as the Great Conjunction.

This December 21st, 45 minutes after sunset look into the southwestern sky and perhaps you’ll see the Christmas Star.

Merry Christmas and may God bless!

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Well, I Finally Believe I Have Discovered What and Where This Elusive Race of “They” Reside

Phrases are part of our everyday lives. Why certain phrases have become so entrenched within our vernacular is an oddity in and of itself. For instance, “they say.” If you think about how often the phrase is used, “they say” everything from A-Z. But who are they? For something that demands so much of our attention, you’d think we’d know. Well, I finally believe I have discovered what and where this elusive race of “they” reside.

Thirty degrees above the horizon in the Northeastern sky is Bob’s Nebula, just six light years to the leeward side of the dwarf star liquor to go. Within this bundle of mist floats a semi-circular conference table. This piece of fifth dimensional furniture is constructed from an exotic silver metal, worthy of appearing in any blockbuster science fiction production.

Five ancient, slumped-over members dressed in outlandish garb  belong to a consortium that evaluate phrases and deem said phrases worthy to carry the stamp of approval to be prefaced by “they say.” And, there you have the long and short of it.

The next time you hear or utter those two unmistakable words, “they say,” and follow it with something like, “a frog will boil to death floating in a pot of H2O if you bring the water temperature up slowly,” take a look to the Northeastern sky and remember from where it came.

And by the by, a frog will not hang around in water until it boils, no matter how slowly you increase the temperature, even amphibians are smarter than that.

Have a great week, Christmas is on the way. Stay safe and may God bless!

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I Try to Bring the World to Life, Even Down to the Idiosyncrasies of Each Being That Calls the Planet Home

I know I’ve said before in different posts now and again how much I enjoy writing science fiction, fantasy, and the like. I don’t know if it’s the development of new worlds or characters and beastly inhabitants of the same. I try to bring the world to life, even down to the idiosyncrasies of each being that calls the planet home including what they drive.

I’ll take advantage of this “driving” segue and delve into something that often fascinates me, that subject being, automobiles.

Why automobiles you ask? And I would answer, it’s not so much, classic cars, muscle cars, new exotic cars, or anything of that nature. What puzzles me is why do individuals become so enamored with a particular make.

Such as: I’m a Chevy man and that’s the only vehicle I’ll ever drive. Now, you can run the gambit through all makes, i.e. Ford, Dodge and any other brand that ever rolled off an assembly line. Come to think of it, my Daddy was a Chevy man . . .me, my favorite vehicle is a brand called, Paid For.

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You Can Use a Metaphor and a Simile to Create an Analogy. That One Sentence Makes My Head Hurt

In last week’s post, I touched on comparisons i.e. metaphors, similes, and analogies. You can delve so deep into these categories, such as: metaphors are like similes as you can use a metaphor and a simile to create an analogy. That one sentence makes my head hurt, so I’ll back off. When I started this post, I wanted to say how some tree leaves in the fall can be similar to writing, as when a leaf clings to its host so tenaciously it refuses to release until the following spring.

As an author I tend to cling to ideas, releasing only when I foresee a specific notion becoming a detriment; it’s then, I run away screaming.

Writing can be a tricky mistress. One moment it’s your friend, fawning over you, enticing your being to know you rank among the greats and the next forcing you into the realization that your words would not be worthy of a bubblegum wrapper.

In short, I write because I love to write, as I’m sure, if you are an author, you do as well. Science Fiction, Fantasy, Christian Fiction, along with each genre I write are a good fit and meld with the way my mind works. I will have to admit though from time to time, I wonder about my cranial function.

In short, I find it best if I hang to the creative side of writing and allow extensive grammar and items such as metaphors, similes, and analogies to reside in the hands of others.

Have a great week, may God bless and don’t take yourself too seriously, because no one else does!

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Now and Again, Things I Would Term, “Idiosyncrasies” Pop Into My Brain as I Write

Now and again, things I would term, “idiosyncrasies,” pop into my brain as I write. It came to me this week that I would combine a number of them into my post and see if you had the same insights into my perceived conundrums. I guess, in words we both can understand, I should restate these items are as out of place or so strange as to warrant further investigation.

My first offering is Latin. I frequently read that Latin is a dead language and no longer spoken. Now, I can get behind this, for I never hear someone in everyday life speaking this dialogue that no longer exists . . . or do I? An argument can easily be made to the contrary, that in America we speak English, a language that an overwhelming amount of root words are derived from Latin. It seems to me the language we call dead, is anything but.

My next fuel for fodder begins with metaphors and similes. Two words that are so similar one can be used to define the other. Throw in analogies along with euphemisms, and you have four words that in one way or the other are tied in with the word similar. Go figure, only in American English,

I would like to conclude with a few examples of spelling words in such a way as to make one think mind altering drugs were used when these words were developed. How about “kernel? Makes sense right? Then, why do we have to clutter things up with “colonel”? Why does “minute” reflect time and “minute” reflect size? You or I can “core” an apple, but if we join the Marines we’re in the “Corps”. Did you know that the dictionary’s definition of “suttle” is a frequent misspelling of “subtle?” If a doe is a deer then why is “dough” “needed” or “kneaded” to make bread?

If you figure this post out, please let me “know,” in “no” uncertain terms because the lack of knowledge can be a “tuff” and in some cases a very “tough” pill to swallow.

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Just When You Think It’s Over, Here We Go Again

Just when you think it’s over, here we go again, at least for those who live in the great state of Georgia. There is going to be a runoff for two Senate seats around the fifth of January. On the news, it was mentioned that the state would be inundated with political commercials until then. If you read my last two posts, you are aware of my distaste for political ads and total disdain for politics in general. I wanted to make sure that I finished what I started, hence the beginning of this post.

I will now attempt to segue from politics into something that makes more sense–leaf removal. I have not a clue how the world revolves in your neighborhood, but in mine, we are overwhelmed with noise pollution from leaf blowers. Saturday mornings and most weekday evenings, (when dry) remind me of an outdoor chainsaw convention.

I’m not trying to direct all the blame throughout the neighborhood without absorbing my part, for my leaves have to be removed, also. I guess the futile part of this plan is on average within 24 to 48 hours of said removal my yard is covered once again in leaves. Now, if you are comparing pros and cons, the con would be a yard full of leaves; on the other hand one distinct pro might be a yard of totally different leaves.

Think of the fun with a new carpet of color adorning your front and back lawns.

Good times!

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Political Adventure, A Foreboding Of Things To Come

This is the week of political adventure, a foreboding of things to come.

It just never ends. As I mentioned last week, I despise politics, so around mid-day on Super Tuesday, I noticed my first epiphany, political ads had come to an end. Oh joy, oh bliss, oh rapture, thought I.

Then, much to my chagrin, came Wednesday morn–no Prez. Even amidst this turmoil, to my delight, no political commercials throughout the day and into the night. Then, sunrise Thursday morning came, sporting no commercials of the political persuasion, but still no Prez.

Friday morning dawned much the same, only, now, we are told there is the possibility of shenanigans. Oh my, don’t tell me there is corruption within the hallowed halls of our political system, for that would be unheard of. Did I mention I really, really don’t care for politics?

Then, Saturday comes and whaddaya know? We finally have a Prez. I can’t understand why anyone would want the job, but I do wish him the best. 

Now, it looks as though my greatest predicament will be deciding the pecking order of the lowest vocation to which one can sink. Right now, politicians are nudging out the ambulance-chasing lawyers for the first to be last.

However, on a serious note, I love this country and pray that God will continue to shine upon her.

Oh, and just in case I didn’t bring it to your attention . . . I loathe politics.

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