Tag Archives: Rejections

I Thunked it Would be Easy, but is Anything Really Easy? If You Were to Ask Me, I’d Say No, but is Anything Really Easy? Probably Not, but is Anything Really…

ss-apr10-38Recently, I’ve been stuck on the subject of rejections during the course of writing. I would be remiss if I were to leave out my entire life story while traveling down that wonderful road of rejection.

During my early days immersed in the glamorous spectacle that is writing, I determined my course from reading other glamorous publications that assisted early glamorous writers.

This publication instructed new writers to attempt having their work placed in magazines and other such articles. This would in essence emulate crawling before walking; showing agents or publishing houses that you were, in fact, a published author lending more credence when they perused your best-selling manuscript.

I began in earnest writing short stories in the science fiction and horror genres. I sent these stories to the larger science fiction magazines, confident I would find a home between the covers.

Alas, no one took the bait. I was forced to drop a notch and send my stories to a magazine a few rungs down the ladder. This continued for some time. I eventually ended up trying to publish my babies in on-line magazines that would boast circulations of dang near a hundred readers.

Well, to say the least, I was scraping the bottom of the literary world. I couldn’t really blame it on the barrel, so the only one I could lay it on would be me. Even though I had developed a rather thick hide, I dare not delve into the world of flash fiction or even one word fiction lest I never find my way out again.

I did the only thing a person who wishes to become a writer can do. I took to honing my writing skills and now have three published books to my credit.

If you get nothing more out of this blog post, let it be this: Author friends don’t let other author friends write stupid.

This has been brought to you by a grant from the Lynn Steigleder Foundation, preventing people from writing sub-standard manuscripts since this blog post began…I hope.

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You Can Paint if You Want to, but Wallpaper is Easier to Clean

I am truly blessed because even as we speak I am smack dab in the middle of publishing my second novel, Eden’s Wake.rewrites

I received the first half from my publisher’s editor and after having a chance to scrutinize the text myself, I sent it back with my comments. Now the first half is complete and I am working on the finale.  The cover will be ready by the end of the week or the beginning of next week. Everything’s looking good for a release date coming soon.

This gives me a chance to look back over this novel from its conception. I originally completed the manuscript in late 2008. I put it aside to begin other projects. When I came back to begin rewrites, it hurt to read the mess that I had written. I rolled up my sleeves all the way to my arm pits and began to rewrite.  Once I finished, I was still not happy but no longer ready to shred the manuscript. I knew the story had promise which made me more determined to end up with a useable product. (Notice I didn’t say a “sellable product.”)

I continued to write, if not on new projects, then I persisted in beating my head up against Eden’s Wake. Then the day came I thought it time to test the waters. I don’t remember what year it was; it’s all kind of a disheveled blur.  Suffice it to say, I received a sufficient amount of rejections to wallpaper the complete interior of my home.

Undaunted (if you want to believe that one), I continued to find more mistakes and correct them just knowing that someday (hopefully before I was dead), that I would find someone who would publish this monster I had created.  Then upon a whim, I began a rewrite to end all rewrites. By the time my rewrites to end all rewrites had been rewritten, I had a novel that I didn’t recognize. Pleased with this new assortment of words, I just knew that the 1349th time would be the charm.

Little did I know that the wallpaper would keep rolling in. I knew there was something wrong, but what was it?

Then one day while throwing my balsa wood airplane (with a little red propeller and rubber band) from the special perch I constructed on top of my giraffe’s head, Archibald, it hit me. I scrambled down, jumped into my Land Rover and drove the grueling 38.7 feet to my back deck.  I ran to my writer’s room, opened my computer and within a month or two had my manuscript finally tweaked.

And the rest is history and so is the wallpaper.

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