Tag Archives: Novel

Occasionally Something Will Take a Long Time. I Don’t Mean a Long Time, I Mean a Looooong Time

Once I completed and published my first novel, Rising Tide, I decided the ending left a question  the reader could use their imagination to determine. This would leave an air of mystique surrounding the book’s conclusion and therefore, not be a good candidate for a sequel.

After being asked if there would be a follow-up to Rising Tide, I was hit with “A light bulb moment.” It took four months to complete the rough draft of book two titled, Eden’s Wake. Without a break, I  began the first re-write. It went fairly well, but I knew I needed some time away from the book. I obeyed my “time away” inclination and turned to work on other projects. Needless to say, this new path didn’t last long and I found myself working on Eden’s Wake’s third re-write. After completing this stage of what was becoming the abyss known as Eden’s Wake, I began to pen the third book in the series, Deadly Reign. The new manuscript went surprisingly well and I found myself pleased with the first draft.

From time to time I would delve into my dark side for a good dose of self-abuse and pull out Eden’s Wake for yet another re-write. During this time of back and forth I completed Deadly Reign, including re-writes. I was satisfied the third manuscript in the series was ready for submission; however, (and this is important) when you are writing a series, the books are normally numbered 1,2,3 and so on; therefore, you can see my conundrum.

After another re-write or two with my parasitic twin, Eden’s Wake, I began a stand-alone science fiction manuscript titled, Terminal Core. As I wrote this new offering, I continued to work on Eden’s Wake. I finally made a decision that surprised even me. Being too hardheaded to trash the troublesome manuscript and having invested years, I made major changes. My new mantra was, gut, re-write, gut, re-write. This worked and seven years after Eden’s Wake’s conception, it was published, April 27, 2015 and I was finally satisfied.

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What People Are Saying About TERMINAL CORE:

eDianne

Jul 29, 2017Dianne rated it ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ really liked it  · review of another edition
They were a small band of rebels, determined to save their planet from the greed and corruption of off-worlders bent on milking its very core dry. Aon isn’t a very large planet, but its core is very special, priceless, actually and there are those who will stop at nothing to have every last piece of it, destroying both the planet and its inhabitants. As good takes on evil in the battle to save Aon, the core itself comes alive with deadly creatures bent on self-preservation and no one is safe.
The Wild West meets Science Fiction in Lynn Steigleder’s TERMINAL CORE as an off-world mining company will try anything to own the priceless element, caladium, including killing a planet.
Characters with simple grit and pluck come to life as futuristic tools able to create everything from food to clothes with a thought let us know that we are NOT home on the range and those horses are not from Earth. Feel like you are in a creative warp between the nineteenth century west and a futuristic sci-fi adventure. This tale of survival will keep readers firmly planted on Aon soil, at least until the core creatures come out to play.Clever writing, interesting characters and a unique spin on other world survival, this is one for the “must try this,” pile! Lynn Steigleder has his creative juices on a rolling boil!I received this copy from Lynn Steigleder in exchange for my honest review.

Ashley Tomlinson

Jun 02, 2017Ashley Tomlinson rated it ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ really liked it

This was one of the most unique, out there books I’ve ever read. It was highly creative which made me want to keep reading. It’s completely different from other sci-fi books that I read which I was worried about when I started it. I read a lot of science fiction books and because of that, I’ve read a lot of what feels like the same book written in a different way. Thankfully this book was on a level on its own and I loved it.

The chapters were really short which I liked at first but after a while it made the story feel jumpy. Like it would jump from scene to scene, character to character and it got frustrating the deeper into the story I got. That’s probably just a personal preference, though. I tend to like stories with one POV so when I read a book with multiple POV’s I favor one and it can make things difficult for me. The world building made up for any POV issues I may have had. It was amazing, I felt like I was in the story too.

I liked the wild wild west feeling I got while reading this, especially with the first few chapters. I also got a Men in Black vibe a time or two. All in all, this was a very interesting Science Fiction that really drew me into the story and didn’t let me go. I highly recommend it. (less)

Brittany

Jan 22, 2017Brittany rated it ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ it was amazing
This was definitely one of those outside the box books. The plot was very creative, which is a nice change from the same old boring stuff a lot of authors recycle over and over again. If you are looking for something new I would highly recommend this book!

Wesley Britton

Jul 31, 2017 Wesley Britton rated it ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦  really liked it

 

Reviewed by Dr. Wesley Britton

I’m far from the first reviewer to point out the obvious—that Terminal Core is certainly sci fi, but it’s also filled to the brim with the flavor of the old, wild American west. On the remote, small planet of Aon (which has a solid core made from Calladium, the most valuable element in the universe), cities no longer exist and the world is very much like an open frontier. Characters wear Stetson hats and cowboy boots and ride horse-like six-legged animals carrying saddle-bags. Some characters speak in dialects that would be equally appropriate for 19th century ranch hands, cattle drivers, or prospectors. On this world of mostly men, much time is spent engaged in drunken fist fights inside old-fashioned saloons where everyone wants their whiskey.

On this back-water world, earth’s president and some duplicitous humans plan to destroy Aon to harvest its valuable core. To accomplish this, crude oil from Earth is shipped to Aon, refined and used to dissolve Calladium. In response, an animated, telepathic being that lives in Calladium incongruously calling itself J. Smith takes two of his “bug thugs” and two human hostages to earth to destroy the extraction centers for the oil. Even more frightening are the lethal creatures on Aon that burrow through earth and flesh. It’s as if the planet is defending itself against the intrusive offworlders.

As the story progressed, told with various points of view recounting a batch of alternating storylines, I was reminded of the novels of L. Sprague de Camp, especially his books of light, entertaining adventure populated by humanoids living among strange aliens using weird, exotic technology. De Camp didn’t explore speculative themes but rather took readers to faraway worlds where nothing was intended to provoke deep thought. Seems to me, Lynn Steigleder is in that tradition.

While not publicized as a YA novel, I think that readership would be an ideal target audience for Terminal Core, especially when all the frightening “monsters” start popping up from the ground. Likewise, I’d think Baby Boomers who might be a bit nostalgic for the breed of sci fi adventure stories we got to read before “hard science fiction” came to dominate sci fi might enjoy a book that is simple entertainment. I’ve read reviews that suggest that fans of Western stories might like Terminal Core, but I’m rather doubtful about that. As it goes along, Terminal Core becomes less and less earth-like with the settings, characters, devices and animals more and more fantastic and unusual.

Yes, Terminal Core is often grisly but few modern readers are going to be put off by weird creatures eating or squashing people and other biped species. The violence kicks into serious high gear in the final chapters when a band of hearty humans battle a relentless tide of killer beasts trying to exterminate all the humans on Aon. I must admit, the final sentences of the book are the most out-of-left-field twists I’ve ever read. Seems to me, the conclusion is a bit gratuitous—to say more would be a major spoiler. And as Terminal Core is apparently planned to be a stand-alone saga, you might find yourself fantasizing your own sequel to Lynn Steigleder’s very imaginative grand finale.

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Rising Tide Synopsis

Rising Tide depicts a world in which land is at a premium due to the advancing sea, where man’s attempt to adapt has led to a decay of morals into survival of the fittest.  In the midst of the ocean, a crew of racketeers rescues a stranded diver, Ben Adams.   Is the rescue just a fortunate coincidence for Ben, or has he been led to this rendezvous with fate for a common goal? A mysterious island inhabited by a primitive yet advanced race of people.  A devious ship captain’s metamorphosis into the essence of evil and a ship’s container discovered by itself in a billion square miles of ocean all play a role in this tale of rebirth for a world corrupted by the collapse  of morality. 

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Terminal Core Synopsis

Aon, a solid core planet made of pure caladium, is under silent attack. The planet’s center is the hardest and most valuable element in the galaxy. Rogue officials, led by President Gaylen and in turn directed by off-worlder’s, set an 80-year plan in motion to seize Aon’s core. Off-worlders work to dissolve the unbreakable core using crude oil obtained from 19th century Earth. Once the oil is refined the by-product, gasoline will soften the caladium, allowing it to be collected. The off-worlders employ a band of corrupt inhabitants to carry out this work. The caladium core consists of living beings–these indestructible creatures prepare to defend their domain against the elements  harvest. Separate alliances unwittingly come together in the dead city of Baine with Clay gravitating to leader. Their objective; preserve the planet. Disregarding all else, the crude oil thieves continue to process the pilfered caladium. Those who desire to save Aon will, along their path, face the core creatures, avoid horrific aberration’s one step behind, and dodge deadly pitfalls ahead. Once Clay melds the coalition, a battle for life and world begin.

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What Could be Better than Writing Science Fiction? It’s like You’re Dr Frankenstein on Steroids. a Little Piece here, a Little Piece There, and What do you Have. . . ? That’s the Great Part. . . Only you Know!

Sixty-seven

“SPEED ‘EM UP, VICTOR,” Clive barked. “We’re barely keeping ahead of this thing.”

“Ha’yah!” Victor cried, accompanied by the crack of his whip. The wagon bolted forward, leaving the ominous hole behind for now.

“What in Bill’s bald head was that?” Carl questioned.

Clive looked at his comrades.

“The more pertinent question is how long can we out run it?”

“That’s impossible to tell,” Victor managed to communicate from the front of the buckboard.

As the wagon rounded a curve, Carl extended a finger and voiced an observation.

“Looks like we’ve kinda got a handle on that question of time you had earlier.”

A three foot high wall of stone stood across the entire width of the road. Any attempt to circumnavigate the obstacle meant an impossible forty-five degree climb to the right and a deadly forty-five degree plummet to the left.

“Victor,” Clive barked, “left turn now!”

Victor looked to the left and eyed his options. He turned to find Clive.

“It’s too─”

“Now!” Clive roared.

The buckboard veered off the road. They found that the steep embankment was a small part of the problem. Hidden beneath the waist high grasses were potholes, ruts and rocks, large enough to destroy an ellack-drawn wagon.

“When I get to the station,” Carl yelled, “somebody’s gonna get an earful.”

Clive nodded. “Give ’em one for me too,”

Clive and Carl sat on the floor of the buckboard with their backs plastered to the front of the wagon. Each man had one hand grasping the iron bar at the bottom of the driver’s seat and the other hand looped through the back of Victor’s belt. They wedged themselves in place by pressing their boots against the barrels in the back of the wagon.

“Thanks for the hand hold,” Victor said, knowing he wouldn’t be heard if he voiced it any louder. Even so, he felt the need to express the sentiment. He was doing nothing more than holding on himself. His boots were locked underneath a flat plate normally used for the driver and passenger to rest their feet on.

The ellacks bore the brunt of the punishment. The muscles in their rear pair of legs contracted, lifting them off the ground, allowing the second pair, ahead of the rear legs to carry the load. Enzymes in the animals’ muscles stiffened the second set of legs to near unbreakable, allowing the joints to remain movable.

Much of the animal’s weight would be shifted to the flanks, causing the front legs to tread lightly, sparing them irreparable damage. Once the crisis was over, the rear legs would relax and lower to the ground and the second pair would contract to the abdomen to heal.

“How much more of this can we take?” Carl shouted.

Clive took a deep breath. “The buckboard can’t last much longer and then we’re next.”

Victor strained to see thirty feet in front of him.

“What is that?” He craned his neck to see, and in an instant was rolling over top of it, “A ramp?” He held his breath until the wagon landed on flat ground. “And, man, am I glad it was there.”

The buckboard came to a slow rolling stop. Victor applied what remained of the parking brake. He dropped the reins, removed his hat and fanned his face.

“All passengers may disembark in an orderly fashion.”

“Just get me out of this death wagon,” Carl said, falling over the side before catching himself.

Clive jumped to the ground.

“Victor, I don’t know how you did it, but you did it good.”

Victor climbed down last, said nothing and made for the anomaly he knew he had seen.

Sixty feet from the buckboard’s final resting place, was a man-made depression. It was more than large enough to hold both ellacks and the wagon. The alarming part of this scenario was the rows of sharpened, six-inch thick wooden spears that lined the bottom of the depression, protruding up some four feet.

“Ya think someone might have it in for us?” Carl asked.

Victor nodded toward a curved structure.

“I think somebody’s doing a stellar job of looking out for us.”

The three men moved as close as they could to the mound of clay that saved their lives. It was placed to carry both vehicle and occupants over the hazard and deposit them with minimal damage.

“Let’s check the buckboard,” Clive said, “then I think it best we get outta here.”

 

*  *  *

 

“How many barrels did we lose?” Clive asked.

Victor continued to drive, Clive rode shotgun, which left Carl to count. They were traveling at a slow, but steady pace. Carl could stand and make a quick count.

“I count seventeen. We started with twenty-four. Seven lost.”

“Not bad for what we’ve been through,” Victor said.

“I guess not,” Clive replied, “I can’t help wondering what’s next.”

“What do you mean next?” Victor asked.

This piqued Carl’s attention, and a third joined in the conversation. “Yeah, next doesn’t sound so good back here either.”

“In case you two haven’t noticed,” Clive said, “the closer we get to where we’re going, the more trouble we run into.” He ran a hand over his stubbly face. “It’s making a fella feel like he ain’t welcome in these parts.”

“I hear ya,” Victor said.

“Where are we going?” Carl asked.

“Whoa,” Victor said. He turned around and looked at Carl . . .  “Right here.”

“Where is here?” Carl asked. “I don’t see anything but dirt and rocks.”

Clive hopped down from his perch.

“That’s a very astute observation,” he said to Carl, “Let me see if I can shed a little more light on the situation for you.”

Clive walked up to a rock formation the size of a three bedroom house. He pushed his hand into a small depression that no one save for Victor would have noticed. Clive removed his hand, then turned and smiled. A muffled click then a steady hum signaled movement.

“What the . . .” Carl mumbled, as a panel slid back into the rock, leaving an open doorway.

“After you,” Clive said.

Victor slipped in; to him this was home. Carl stumbled through slowly; his head moving up one side, across the top, then down the other.

A short walk down a dim hallway opened into a single round room with a dome ceiling. A large pipeline entered from the east wall, continued through the building, and exited out the west wall. Three quarters of the pipe were covered with a square shroud that reached the floor. Three steps led to a small elevated control center.

“So, close your mouth and tell me what you think,” Clive said. He adjusted several switches on the wall, bringing up the lights and adjusting the temperature down a few degrees.

Carl lowered his head from gawking at the ceiling and looked at Clive.

“I want you to tell me what all this is. Quincy mentioned his involvement in an operation, but indicated nothing like this.”

Victor had climbed the stairs and was working at the power console.

“What this amounts to,” Clive said, “is a big siphon. Crude oil extracted from Earth is pumped through this pipeline and into the storage facility at Baine.”

“I’ve seen nothing in Baine that would show any liquids other than liquor and urine,” Carl said.

Clive chuckled, “The other Baine.”

“I’ll let you finish before I bring that up again.”

“Good enough. As I was saying, the oil is pumped through this pipeline. The covered area you see is a miniature refinery, in part, at least. As the crude travels through this area, forty percent of one of its components, called gasoline, is extracted and pumped into an underground storage tank beneath our feet. The liquid is extremely flammable and volatile if confined without a means of pressure relief.”

“All that stuff is fine, well and good, so let’s talk about the old city of Baine.” Carl tipped his hat back and placed both hands on his hips. “From what I’ve gathered, and I believe these to be reliable sources, that place is just as lethal now as it was when people occupied its hallowed halls. And feel free to ignore the hallowed halls reference.”

“Calm down,” Clive said, “what you’ve heard has brought about the exact response it was intended to. That way people would stay away from the old Baine, allowing us to work unabated by sightseers and crooks alike.”

“Hey, boss man,” Victor said, “we’ve got a problem. When we first arrived, our underground tanks were topped off. Since then, we’ve lost a third of our product out of tanks one and two, and it looks like tank three is gone.”

“You mean empty?”

“No, I mean gone.”

A barely perceptible groan could be felt.

“Now what?” Victor said.

“Well, I guess you got your answer,” Carl said.

Clive looked at him. “Allow me to refresh your memory and I quote, ‘I can’t help wondering what’s next.”

The floor buckled, the slight groan now a full-fledged symphony of twisting tanks, floor plates and girders being ripped in two.

“I believe that’s our signal,” Clive yelled over the ear splitting chaos.

Three men exited the doorway as the faux building collapsed. Loading once again into the buckboard, they relived a scene that had played out hours earlier and would play out again.

 

 

 

 

 

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Excerpt from Eden’s Wake

Belac, Ben, Eve, Pete and three of Belac’s men took turns lowering into the cave through the hole used to steal the Andor. Seven others remained above to trace the same path that the ones below would traverse.

            Belac handed each of his men two wooden branches and kept two for himself to use as torches. Once they were lit, he spoke.

            “You must remember the Andor is not to be touched. It must be carried by the poles inserted through the rings on each side.  This is also the same for the Shadow Ones. If they touch the Andor they will cease to be.”

            As the group moved deeper into the cave, they struck the ceiling with a long wooden rod. The men above would place an ear to the ground to follow them as they progressed.

            “We will halt for a moment,” Belac said. “The torches are growing dim and we must replenish the fuel supply.” He opened a bag and pulled several strips of cloths smeared with a black substance that smelled of petroleum. He wrapped the cloth around his torch. At once, the fire light increased. He did the same for the three of his comrades and then the group continued on.

            “Will the torches help us against the Shadow Ones in the caves as we search for the Andor?” Ben asked. 

            “In a minor way,” Belac replied, “if your skill is such that you are able to touch them with the flame.”

            “Is this the reason we have the torches instead of using the night vision instilled within us?” Ben asked.

            Belac nodded.

             “We will rely on both.”

            The group continued deeper into the underground lair. As they traveled through the tunnel it divided, heading in different directions leaving a menagerie of catacombs. They came to a halt with no clear direction to search.

            Belac pulled more of the strips from his bag and wrapped the torches increasing the light throughout the immediate area.

            “Gather the group closer together,” Belac ordered. “We must intensify the light into a single component, to battle our enemy.”      

            Several shadow creatures danced in and out of the groups vision as they moved closer and then further away from the firelight. As they did so, the torch bearers would swing their burning weapons in unison, causing portions of the creatures to disappear and forcing them to back away.

            The group moved with intent following the retreating creatures, all the while developing an insight of where their quarry lay.

            “I sense we are growing closer,” Belac said, extending his hand to stop Ben, Eve, and Pete’s progress.

            Belac’s three men took the lead, their torchlight fading. Volton, who traveled ahead of the rest, left the ground without warning. Amar reacted, thrusting his torch into the shadow creature holding his friend. The flame startled the creature, causing the spot it touched on its dark form to disappear; however, the gesture came too late as Volton slammed into the ceiling hard enough to shatter his spine and flatten the back of his head. He fell to the ground with a sickening thud that left him twitching as his involuntary nervous system protested one final time.

            “Everyone back!” Belac bellowed.

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To Write or Not to Write. Whether Tis Nobler to Suffer the Slings and Arrows of Outrageous . . . . oops! Wrong Soliloquy

I thought I’d take a moment to relay the circumstances which led me to become a writer. I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis November 2006. Two months later, January 2007, the position I held as a trade show construction supervisor and warehouse manager was abolished after sixteen years. During our winter fishing trip to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, my son suggested I give writing a shot. I began to pen my old standard, ‘short stories,’ while still employed, uncertain if I had a novel within. A story line soon emerged pulling me into the world of “Rising Tide.” With my first novel reaching completion, I decided to delve into the world of self-employment, opening a single employee (me) drafting business (CAD).

****

It’s now the spring of 2008. I find a publisher to take on my novel which becomes a reality in the spring of 2009.  My drafting business is going gangbusters. I’m having to put in 14 hours a day 6 days a week.

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July 2008 rolls around, and guess what . . .the economy tanks, my business nearly beating it down the toilet, and I’m up to my armpits in edits and re-writes, which ain’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it proves that one out of two (here’s that word again) ain’t bad.

****

Fast forward to today. I recently released my fourth novel, “Deadly Reign.” I have two more books in the works. The next in the “Rising Tide” series and a stand-alone novel that revives a character from a previous book used in a cameo role and now as the protagonist.  I’ve just scratched the surface in the world of authorism. So  I certainly don’t feel qualified to offer any spectacular, over the top, fail proof words of wisdom.  If I were to offer any advice, I’d simply say:  Never give up, expect rejection, don’t take yourself too seriously, and most importantly, have fun. God bless!

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