Tag Archives: manuscript

Marketing is a Necessary Necessity That Will Unnecessarily Necessitate My Necessities

“This is probably the most mature, astute novel of the last half century that I’ve just finished. Me want ice cream.”

Ifin I had my druthers, I’d write all of the time. Alas, knowing this is a virtual impossibility, I’m bound to taking care of all the other stuff that pops up. Of course, I’m speaking within the parameters of writing and its many aspects.

I spend an enormous amount of time on marketing. When I published my first novel, I didn’t realize this milestone was the easy part. With a thousand or so new titles jumping out each day, how do you get your work before the eyes of the public without this valuable tool?

All right, so I know I have to market . . .  what does this mean? Sometimes I wonder if there are as many ways to market a book, as there are books? I know I’m being a bit facetious but there are many methods to employ into your marketing scheme.

My day goes something like this:  In the morning, I’m ready to play. What’s the first game?  Marketing for Money. I try to limit my time to several hours in order to promote my books each day. What’s the next game? Depending on the day, it could be “What’s my Blog” or to keep my website interesting there’s always, “Name that Newsletter.” Every once in a while I’ll slip in, “Support my Short Story.” Then comes the time of day I actually get to work on my latest manuscript. I call this, “Recess.” When done, I usually find I’m satisfied with the day’s work and fired up for tomorrow.

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I’ve Never Experienced Writer’s Block, I’ve Never Experienced Writer’s Block, I’ve Never Experienced Writer’s Block, I’ve Never Experienced Writer’s Block…

Imagine acquiring a literary agent. This agent quickly finds a publisher for your first book. You’re given deadlines to complete various parts of your manuscript. Things are going fine until your well-oiled machine slams into a concrete wall. Sound familiar?

Oh no! You’ve run into that immovablewriters_block_400 force known as writer’s block. This will send the average author screaming toward the hills.

Are you picking up what I am carefully placing down for you…?…Okay, good, let us continue.

What once was on schedule has now begun to slip behind. No big worries so far, but pandemonium may lie in the future if this problem is not corrected…sound familiar yet?

Guess what kids?  We’re now in the future which has been carefully renamed the present. Your publisher with much foreboding is insisting you complete the remaining pieces of your manuscript. You assure said publisher the remaining chapters are complete and will be sent next week after your final edits.

Your next move is to write the remaining few chapters.

Next week has come and gone and your publisher is threatening to cancel your contract. Your agent is also threatening cancellation and possible law suites to follow. Now, I ask again, does this sound familiar? If it does, you’re in a world of trouble and should have paid more attention to your deadlines.

As for me, I’ve been unable to coerce an agent so far. I have come close, but we know that close and three dollars will get you a cup of coffee. Until that day I’ll rely on small presses; they’re wonderful to work with.

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Just Cause It Says to do What It Says, Don’t Mean to do What it Said. Notice the Play on Words? Well, There Ain’t None!!!

JFSPunctuateOnce you finish your manuscript and begin rewrites and edits, are you adept with the grammatical aspects of what you’ve written? Or are you unsure of the difference between a period and parentheses?

I’ve learned a lot over the years of struggling through hundred thousand word manuscripts. That being said there’s a lot I should have learned struggling through hundred thousand word manuscripts but somehow failed to do so.

For instance: A comma is used to denote a pause. You think this would be an objective comment until people commence to slinging commas throughout a paragraph; then, it becomes very subjective.

I haven’t been able to find two people that would agree on the placement of commas; of course, some of them would argue the color of clear.

My next nemesis is the semi-colon. If I’m ignorant enough to ask, I’ll receive different answers that I don’t understand anyway so I might as well keep my mouth shut.

And finally, anything that dangles sends me running and screaming like a banshee bearing down on its next meal.

Maybe I’m not as bad as I’ve portrayed myself to be, but if the truth be known, I would just as soon drink from a mud puddle and eat rocks than edit a manuscript.

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I Thunked it Would be Easy, but is Anything Really Easy? If You Were to Ask Me, I’d Say No, but is Anything Really Easy? Probably Not, but is Anything Really…

ss-apr10-38Recently, I’ve been stuck on the subject of rejections during the course of writing. I would be remiss if I were to leave out my entire life story while traveling down that wonderful road of rejection.

During my early days immersed in the glamorous spectacle that is writing, I determined my course from reading other glamorous publications that assisted early glamorous writers.

This publication instructed new writers to attempt having their work placed in magazines and other such articles. This would in essence emulate crawling before walking; showing agents or publishing houses that you were, in fact, a published author lending more credence when they perused your best-selling manuscript.

I began in earnest writing short stories in the science fiction and horror genres. I sent these stories to the larger science fiction magazines, confident I would find a home between the covers.

Alas, no one took the bait. I was forced to drop a notch and send my stories to a magazine a few rungs down the ladder. This continued for some time. I eventually ended up trying to publish my babies in on-line magazines that would boast circulations of dang near a hundred readers.

Well, to say the least, I was scraping the bottom of the literary world. I couldn’t really blame it on the barrel, so the only one I could lay it on would be me. Even though I had developed a rather thick hide, I dare not delve into the world of flash fiction or even one word fiction lest I never find my way out again.

I did the only thing a person who wishes to become a writer can do. I took to honing my writing skills and now have three published books to my credit.

If you get nothing more out of this blog post, let it be this: Author friends don’t let other author friends write stupid.

This has been brought to you by a grant from the Lynn Steigleder Foundation, preventing people from writing sub-standard manuscripts since this blog post began…I hope.

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I’ve Been Rejected so Many Times I Created a Novel From my Rejection Notices…and What Do you Know, Acceptance at Last.

simon-chan-network-marketing-training-rejectionI’m sure you’ve heard about authors being turned down numerous times before finally finding acceptance. For example: J.K. Rowlings was rejected a dozen or so times before someone found space for “Harry Potter.”

Stephenie Meyer was another author scorned until she found huge success with her ” Twilight Saga.”

Even Stephen King was rejected thirty times before his first novel “Carrie” found a home.

Keeping these in mind, do you ever wonder if the agents/publishers that rejected these stories are still kicking themselves around the block?

I’ll admit the job of an agent having to sort through thousands of manuscripts has got to be a daunting task at the very least; however, sometimes it tickles me to think of a trip around the block motivated by one’s foot. My concept of this scenario would become more evident as my series of rejections increased to a volume that would rival an elementary school’s paper drive.

Once my breakout series is discovered and I sell a few bazillion copies, I’ll think of all of those rejections and realize there’s just not enough time, nor any reason to hold a grudge.

Guess I’ll just continue writing bestsellers and maybe, just maybe, slip a few emails expressing my gratitude for their refusals. After all, that’s one of the reasons I’ll be where I am when I get there.

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I Tired ‘o’ Mush. Tonite I Gets Pizza From Pizza Store

young-kid-with-cell-phoneI’m contemplating beginning a manuscript (I say beginning because I’m not sure it could ever be finished) on prevalence ridiculously personified.

This would be somewhere between an electronic “how to” manual, The Human Condition and Why…why what, you ask? No rhyme or reason, just why.

Now I will lay out a basic outline of this forth coming monster.

First: The smart phone. Just as my own personal survey, I pay attention to easy statistical situations, for instance, an elevator. The next time you’re ferrying up and down in one of these closed transports, notice how many people have their head down and are sliding their fingers merrily across the face of the phone.

Likewise, you can usually tell those who have a cell phone hanging on their side or in the top of their pocket book not being used.

I know this is not a major scientific study done over a wide group for an extended period of time; however, I determined three out of five persons with a mobile phone (and let’s face it, there aren’t many people without one) are using them at any given time.

I saw two young men walking side by side in a parking lot, both conversing on mobile phones, I couldn’t help but wonder, “Are they talking to each other?”

Now, the demographic for the mobile phone phenomena, be it a smart or a stupid phone (I want you to notice that smart and stupid is interchangeable between phone and operator) knows no boundaries. Kids operate them; seniors operate them and every age in between.

Now, I must admit, I fall into the category of smart phone with stupid operator.

It all comes down to this: we’ve created a monster that’s never going to go away, but aren’t all the nice melodies playing everywhere we go from these electronic creatures a nice by product of an unnecessary evil?

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

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It Ain’t Over Till the Fat Manuscript Screams, “Its Over!”

'Can you redo this manuscript, John, and make it less stupid?'

‘Can you redo this manuscript, Lynn, and make it less stupid?’

If you read my blog last week and the week before, you’ll know I’ve been hashing out a novel back and forth with my editor trying to get it to the printer.

As I have mentioned, I thought we were done and the last copy I sent the publisher would be it. Now, one more thing I said, tongue in cheek, was having to read the manuscript another time.

Another thought that comes to mind (one also brought forth in my last blog) is I’ve read the book probably thirty times, including last week, the week before and probably the week before that.

Well, wonder of wonders, I received an email from my publisher saying the manuscript has been sent to the printer and now we have a proof.

Guess what? I get to read the proof (just another name for a finished manuscript), one more time.

Once I have completed this task (as long as nothing goes awry), we will actually go to print.

I cautiously say, “Hallelujah! I’m done and ready for the next!”

I hope I haven’t bored you to tears with this never-ending story but I felt it was something I needed to scrap off my chest…you know, cathartic.

Of course, this is determined by what the proof says.

Guess I’ll just have to wait and see.

Until next week, happy trails and whip them cantankerous manuscripts into shape.

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