Tag Archives: Latin

Dabbling into the World of an Author

My post last week dabbled into the world of being an author.  I suppose that is proper since I am an author.

Now, this week I intend to dabble, once again in author mode, to bringing out connections to words that should not be.

For instance, why do we take a word that ends in l-e-t, such as Chevrolet, and pronounce it as though it was spelled, Chevrolay?

Another miss-que that chaps my shorts are words like, “minute” to denote sixty seconds or “minute” to describe something very small. While we’re on the subject let’s expose a few more homographs. How about “lead,” as to lead others down a trail or “lead,” a piece of heavy toxic metal. Then, again, we have “bass,” a fresh water fish, and “bass,” a musical instrument.

Here is another conundrum. A great number of our words have their origin in Latin. There is a contingency of people who speak fluent Latin. I’ve always heard that Latin is a dead language. I don’t know about you, but I think not.

And we mustn’t forget our fine friend phonics or as I would be remiss to say “fonics,” in staying with the very foundation of applying fonics.

Allow me to show you what a change our friend has made in my life by offering a short sentence.

Hoked on fonics, it werked for me!

Even though I covered this in my last post I feel as though I should relive the idiom one last time. Although I guess we can cross that bridge when we get to it.

Enjoy your week and may God bless you and yours richly!

 

 

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As an Author, I Spoil Myself by Taking an Occasional Stab at Word Creation

As an author, I spoil myself by taking an occasional stab at word creation when deemed necessary. Since it’s my work, I don’t mind indulging into what normally would be considered taboo.

In the real world, I believe there are numerous words that could benefit from a redo. For instance, an un-popped piece of corn is known as a “kernel;” yet, in the military, the rank carrying the same name is “colonel.”

By the same token, how can the word, “corps,” be pronounced, “core,” or if you like, “cor?”

While we’re on the subject of the military, why is a dining hall referred to as a “mess?”

Did you know the shortest sentence in the English language is “Go!”

Shouldn’t Pedialyte® for adults be . . . I don’t know, more like, Adultialyte?

Now, here’s one that’ll frost your corn flakes: If Latin is a dead language, having it be the root of the lion’s share of English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, and the Mediterranean Sea area, tells me it’s alive and well. If nothing else I hope this week’s post will give you something to ponder.

Have a spectacular week and may God shower you with blessings.

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It Seems The Letter ‘X’ is Only Used in the Word ‘X-ray’.

I’ve been writing for a while, and in all those years, I have found the alphabet has served me well. However, I find myself tripping over a letter I seldom use, but still question. It seems the letter ‘X’ is only used in the word ‘X-ray’. Oh, I’m sure there may be another instance or two, but you can bet they are few and far between.

In most instances, the letter ‘X’ is pronounced as ‘Z’.

Why don’t we just cut to the chase, change X-ray to Z-ray, dump the ‘X’ and lighten our load by one letter that we’ve been carrying since the 7th century? Our alphabet was, of course, derived from that dead language, Latin, that no one speaks, but everyone uses. In fact, so many of our words are derived from Latin, I suppose you could say that we actually speak Latin.2, instead of English.

One place ‘X’ = ‘Z’ can be seen by the pound is television. With the influx of new drugs hitting the airways every day, many of the names attached to these pharmaceuticals contain an ‘X.’  In some cases, the name will be spelled with an ‘X’ and a ‘Z’. I’m sure you know how these letters are pronounced.

Just a little tidbit to begin your week, and since I mentioned the upcoming week, be sure to have a great one!

God Bless and keep you safe!

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For Something That is Supposed to be Dead, It Looks Alive and Well to Me

I realized that Latin is no longer spoken. In fact, I’ve heard it referred to as a dead language. If this principle is held true throughout the world (and I believe it is), why is the root word in the majority of our vocabulary contrived in a dead language?

I’d like to take this a bit deeper. Let’s begin with Plato, student of Socrates and known as one of the great philosophers. When I think of someone who has devoted their life to philosophy, I think of that someone who is so ingrained in the process of thinking they would rather argue a point than prove it with evidence . . . nuff said.

I realize this is a bit out of order, but now a short blurb for Socrates. He was also a great philosopher but a thinker nonetheless and a pretty smart guy. The big difference between me and Socrates is that the grey matter in my cranium may not be as stimulating; however, the information in my sci-fi/fantasy world is recorded, something that Socrates failed to do . . . nuff said, once again.

I guess what it boils down to is writing while writing or writing by speaking and $3.00 will get you a mediocre cup of coffee . . . and this time I really mean . . . nuff said.         

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