Tag Archives: American English

Now and Again, Things I Would Term, “Idiosyncrasies” Pop Into My Brain as I Write

Now and again, things I would term, “idiosyncrasies,” pop into my brain as I write. It came to me this week that I would combine a number of them into my post and see if you had the same insights into my perceived conundrums. I guess, in words we both can understand, I should restate these items are as out of place or so strange as to warrant further investigation.

My first offering is Latin. I frequently read that Latin is a dead language and no longer spoken. Now, I can get behind this, for I never hear someone in everyday life speaking this dialogue that no longer exists . . . or do I? An argument can easily be made to the contrary, that in America we speak English, a language that an overwhelming amount of root words are derived from Latin. It seems to me the language we call dead, is anything but.

My next fuel for fodder begins with metaphors and similes. Two words that are so similar one can be used to define the other. Throw in analogies along with euphemisms, and you have four words that in one way or the other are tied in with the word similar. Go figure, only in American English,

I would like to conclude with a few examples of spelling words in such a way as to make one think mind altering drugs were used when these words were developed. How about “kernel? Makes sense right? Then, why do we have to clutter things up with “colonel”? Why does “minute” reflect time and “minute” reflect size? You or I can “core” an apple, but if we join the Marines we’re in the “Corps”. Did you know that the dictionary’s definition of “suttle” is a frequent misspelling of “subtle?” If a doe is a deer then why is “dough” “needed” or “kneaded” to make bread?

If you figure this post out, please let me “know,” in “no” uncertain terms because the lack of knowledge can be a “tuff” and in some cases a very “tough” pill to swallow.

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Do Chipmunks Scheme About Hassling Hounds?

Anthropomorphism (giving human characteristics to an animal) was probably solidified in this day and age by Walt Disney. That’s just my opinion, but given that and $3.00, you could come away with a decent cup of coffee.

I find myself guilty of this many times over. Not just people talk in my novels, but the majority of creatures with a heartbeat tend to spew out conversational pieces better than most Americans. Of course, American English being what it is, speaking it in some form is not a difficult feat.

The all-time voice of voices was Mel Blanc. Able to stream the dialogue from every character in a single cartoon, including Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird and everyone in between, was absolutely amazing.

Fortunately, as I write I am able to see and hear my characters as I create them. Even the ambient noise comes to life as I pen each novel. I am so appreciative to God for giving me the ability to place my imagination on paper. Now it’s up to me not to blow it!

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If I Were a Word and You Were a Word Would We Fall in Love and Forever Be Separated by an Evil Semicolon Bent on Word Domination?

weasel-words-wordleBeing an author, it goes without saying I use a lot of words. In fact, without words it would be hard to call myself an author. To take it a little further, there would be no need to consider myself an author. To take it a lot further, there’s no way I could be writing this blog, and civilization as we know it would more than likely collapse. But I digress.

          Words, in and of themselves, are interesting little creatures; however, we tend to get a little carried away in their usage. For whatever reason, we have a hard time allowing one or two words to describe a subject. For instance, simile, metaphor, analogy, and euphemism are four words used to describe very similar things.

          We have the words laceration, contusion, and abrasion. Do we really need three more words like cut, bruise, and scrape to describe the same conditions?

          If we use the word “stuff”, we find ourselves with an avalanche of similar words at our disposal. Now I’ll be the first to admit that multiple words saying the same thing can be useful, but enough is enough.

No wonder American English is so hard for someone of a different culture to assimilate, especially when you figure in words spelled the same but pronounced differently. I’ll leave you with a few examples: minute, read, wind, lead, live, wound, tear, bow, close, and excuse. You get the idea, and with that last word, if you use it correctly, that’s my excuse to end this post!

 

 

 

 

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