Some Things are as Strange as Strange Can Be

Some things are as strange as strange can be.

When I’m working on a novel, there are times I find it necessary to make up a new word because none of the ones available are just right. Usually what I create fits the need as if the word has always existed. So, why didn’t it?

On other occasions, the words or phrases I question are commonly used; however, make no sense. For instance, take the word, “mess.” Why is a dining hall in the military called a “mess hall”? Mess comes from the French term “mes,” meaning “a portion of food.” Guess, that explains it.

Another way in which the same word is used, which at one time confounded me, was when people said they had “a mess of greens,” “a mess of fish,” and anything else you may want “a mess of.” It seems the meaning of the word “mess” is the same in both instances, “a portion of food.”

Another item of interest, concerns dead bodies. In real life, the victims are almost never outlined in chalk for fear of contaminating a crime scene; however, have you ever seen a crime scene on TV without a chalk outline?

And one more I’ve heard for years says a frog will sit in tepid water and cook to death if the temperature is slowly brought to the boiling point.  Not true. Will wonders never cease?

Just a few interesting tidbits to start your week. So have a great one, and may God bless!

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