Now and Again, Things I Would Term, “Idiosyncrasies” Pop Into My Brain as I Write

Now and again, things I would term, “idiosyncrasies,” pop into my brain as I write. It came to me this week that I would combine a number of them into my post and see if you had the same insights into my perceived conundrums. I guess, in words we both can understand, I should restate these items are as out of place or so strange as to warrant further investigation.

My first offering is Latin. I frequently read that Latin is a dead language and no longer spoken. Now, I can get behind this, for I never hear someone in everyday life speaking this dialogue that no longer exists . . . or do I? An argument can easily be made to the contrary, that in America we speak English, a language that an overwhelming amount of root words are derived from Latin. It seems to me the language we call dead, is anything but.

My next fuel for fodder begins with metaphors and similes. Two words that are so similar one can be used to define the other. Throw in analogies along with euphemisms, and you have four words that in one way or the other are tied in with the word similar. Go figure, only in American English,

I would like to conclude with a few examples of spelling words in such a way as to make one think mind altering drugs were used when these words were developed. How about “kernel? Makes sense right? Then, why do we have to clutter things up with “colonel”? Why does “minute” reflect time and “minute” reflect size? You or I can “core” an apple, but if we join the Marines we’re in the “Corps”. Did you know that the dictionary’s definition of “suttle” is a frequent misspelling of “subtle?” If a doe is a deer then why is “dough” “needed” or “kneaded” to make bread?

If you figure this post out, please let me “know,” in “no” uncertain terms because the lack of knowledge can be a “tuff” and in some cases a very “tough” pill to swallow.

Leave a comment

Filed under On writing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.